From cluttered space to clear mind

Make mine a clutter-free space

Make mine a clutter-free space

I  believe that having too much clutter gets in the way of us living our lives, and I am on a mission to liberate clients from their stuff.

If we are surrounded by objects from our past, then that’s where we are stuck — living in the past! We need to get perspective because we are emotionally attached to our possessions.

They remind us of good times, bad times, people we love, people we have lost. They are packed with memories. But here’s the thing: the memories are in our heads, not in our possessions.

If we take an objective approach it’s easier to have clarity, because clearing our physical space also clears our heads providing room for newness in our lives. And this is what I do with as a certified clutter clearing practitioner.

Generally, I work with two types of clients:

  • Those who have become overwhelmed by having too many things and who are disorganised or stuck in their lives

  • Senior clients who want to downsize and move to a smaller property and need help to let go of the possessions that they cannot take with them

in both cases, working with someone who is objective, not emotionally involved, and who can offer an organised approach helps them stay on track. It makes such a difference to my clients, enabling decision making that seemed previously impossible.

It is amazing what a client can achieve with this support. Importantly, I never tell people what to let go of, the decision is all theirs.

Seeing solutions beyond clutter

Sometimes clients are embarrassed to show me their spaces, but I am totally non-judgmental. I don’t see mess, just solutions.

Clutter comes in many forms. The most common areas of ‘over stuffication’ include: clothes, shoes and bags, books, paperwork, kitchens, tools and ornaments.

Once you realise, that in clearing clutter you are really only making one decision at a time, then it is much easier to let go.

The letting-go process can be very emotional. I have had clients who run the gamut of emotions: crying one minute, angry the next before laughing hysterically.

As we clear, we feel a weight of responsibility lift. We don’t have to feel we should wear, use or look after particular items any more. It’s actually a relief to let it go, we free ourselves up.

Free up space to open your heart

I had a client who had a mass of stuff under her bed, and amongst it all were photo albums of her three failed relationships, two of which were marriages, including wedding rings. There was also old jewellery and teddies from her parents and grandparents, and even the ashes of her dog that had died eight years ago!

Clearly, there was a lot of emotional weight to hang on to. Through the process, she took some photos of the items that held the most meaning. As she got into the swing of it, it became easier and easier to let most of it go and to laugh while she did it. It was literally a giving away of negative energy.

And then this actually happened: the week after that clearing, she met her current partner of four years, the love of her life! She had cleared out and made space for him to come into her life and has never been happier! Way to go!

There are light moments too. I worked with a hoarder and while clearing a set of shelves, I came across a round raffia box with a lid, opened it and jumped out of my skin. Inside was the cast off skeleton of her old pet tarantula after it shed it’s skin one last time. My client laughed and said, “ Oh, that’s Eddie, he was terrific!”

Ideal times for a good clear out

Spring is the traditional time for a good clear out as are Christmas and New Year periods. Also moving home, feeling stuck in life or having a change in circumstances all provide excellent opportunities to declutter.

Try to determine what is working for you and what will work for the new life you want to make. Let go of what is past its time with you. I can promise an energetic shift that brings clarity and new direction to your life.

 
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 To find out more about Tracey’s work, contact Clutter Clearing Company

Author Tracey Baylis

Author Tracey Baylis